John Coal’s Game of Thrones thread in exile

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Expand view Topic review: John Coal’s Game of Thrones thread in exile

Re: John Coal’s Game of Thrones thread in exile

Post by Guest » Fri Jun 14, 2019 9:07 pm

It all makes sense now.
Sam = Sam
Jon and Arya are Frodo. They cannot stay in the land that they saved. Jon can also be Galadriel, because even though he passed the test, he went North rather than West to diminish.
The Iron Throne is The Ring.
And of course Danaerys is Gollum, although I would prefer Emilia Clarke in a nude scene over Andy Serkis.
Sansa is the Queen IN the North, rather than Queen of the North, because that is such a Holy Roman Empire solution. Is the King/Queen in the North still an Elector? Will they need a Pragmatic Sanction since Bran cannot have an Heir? Or can he?

If the Night’s Watch was wiped out, who were the Men in Black who escorted Jon to the Wall?
Why didn’t Grey Worm execute Jon?

Re: John Coal’s Game of Thrones thread in exile

Post by Voice From Limbo » Fri May 24, 2019 5:17 pm

The Inevitable Pitch Meeting:

https://youtu.be/jAhKOV3nImQ

Re: John Coal’s Game of Thrones thread in exile

Post by Guest » Thu May 23, 2019 7:46 pm

Funniest callback or Easter Egg, or whatever they call it.
Roose Bolton embraces Ramsay. “You will always be my son. My first born son.” Ramsay stabs Roose.
Jon/Aegon and Danaerys embrace. “You will always be my Queen.” Jon stabs her.

Re: John Coal’s Game of Thrones thread in exile

Post by Condottiero » Wed May 22, 2019 5:02 am

Winnie wrote:So. It may be worse than I thought. Maybe they had different writers and directors for each scene.
And the “continuity guy (or girl)” was an intern with no power. :cry:
Oh well. As long as “they” were bound by GRRRRRR Martin’s published books, they could stay relatively on track.
When they were on their own, all hell broke loose.
Sand Snakes. >cough cough< First sign they were on their own. What an abortion.

From 2016: Game of Thrones' Dorne storyline — and why people hate it — explained

The groan-inducing cheesiness of the Sand Snakes has been well-litigated elsewhere, but perhaps the biggest disappointment to fans of Martin's books is the showrunners’ decision to omit Doran’s secret pro-Targaryen plot entirely. This revelation was a hugely satisfying moment, and it seems odd that the show decided to nix it in favor of simply having Doran killed off.

Now, Benioff and Weiss know more about where Martin is going with this story than I do. Perhaps they concluded that the Dorne-Targaryen alliance isn't headed anywhere interesting. Their changes to the Dorne plot also could have been fallout from their apparent decision to cut the aforementioned new Targaryen claimant ("Aegon" a.k.a. "Young Griff") and his accompanying storyline entirely.

Much can go right when Benioff and Weiss decide to diverge from Martin's books — everyone seemed to love last year's entirely invented "Hardhome" episode. But overall, the disappointing Dorne storyline is a reminder of how diverging too far from the source can go very, very wrong. And it's a challenge the showrunners will have to work through again and again, now that they've all but run out of Martin's published material. Hopefully they can pull it off.

:lol:

Re: John Coal’s Game of Thrones thread in exile

Post by Winnie » Wed May 22, 2019 4:24 am

So. It may be worse than I thought. Maybe they had different writers and directors for each scene.
And the “continuity guy (or girl)” was an intern with no power. :cry:
Oh well. As long as “they” were bound by GRRRRRR Martin’s published books, they could stay relatively on track.
When they were on their own, all hell broke loose.
Sand Snakes. >cough cough< First sign they were on their own. What an abortion.

Re: John Coal’s Game of Thrones thread in exile

Post by Condottiero » Wed May 22, 2019 4:08 am

Winnie wrote:I have a theory. :D
It’s why plot was so lacking in continuity.
The scripts for each episode were written by different people. And they were directed by different people.
Someone in charge should have coordinated this, but they fell down on the job.
At the end of Episode 5, Arya was covered in dirt and ash. Her face had huge scars and blood streaks. She famously rides off on the “pale horse” of Revelations.
Episode 6. “An hour later”, she is wearing clean clothes. Her is clean. No blood on her face. No horse.
Question. Continuity?

How about Grey Worm smugly executing prisoners one minute and then appearing next to Dany Bois, before Jon Snow made it to the top of the steps? Could be different days, but JS seemed like he was heading to an audience with Danaerys after the argument...

Was Jon Snow supposed to be the one delivering Bran's speech? The uttered lines seemed like something he'd say...

I wish someone would've punched Grey Worm in the face! Maybe he'll waste away from butterfly fever on Naath...

'Game of Thrones' Finale May Have Revealed How Daenerys Comes Back to Life: Melisandre wasn't the only Red Priestess around...

:roll:

Re: John Coal’s Game of Thrones thread in exile

Post by Guest » Wed May 22, 2019 1:23 am

Voice From Limbo wrote:Those happen in the best productions -- there's a big one in Casablanca.

How about "GoT -- the Epilogue": all the writers and showrunners gather to raise a celebratory pint.

And are fried by Drogon.

Yeah. I want to watch that. They got a lot of ‘splaIning to do.

Re: John Coal’s Game of Thrones thread in exile

Post by Voice From Limbo » Wed May 22, 2019 1:04 am

Those happen in the best productions -- there's a big one in Casablanca.

How about "GoT -- the Epilogue": all the writers and showrunners gather to raise a celebratory pint.

And are fried by Drogon.

Re: John Coal’s Game of Thrones thread in exile

Post by Winnie » Tue May 21, 2019 11:58 pm

I have a theory. :D
It’s why plot was so lacking in continuity.
The scripts for each episode were written by different people. And they were directed by different people.
Someone in charge should have coordinated this, but they fell down on the job.
At the end of Episode 5, Arya was covered in dirt and ash. Her face had huge scars and blood streaks. She famously rides off on the “pale horse” of Revelations.
Episode 6. “An hour later”, she is wearing clean clothes. Her is clean. No blood on her face. No horse.
Question. Continuity?

Re: John Coal’s Game of Thrones thread in exile

Post by Condottiero » Tue May 21, 2019 12:25 pm

Winnie wrote:“Book Quaithe” predicted three betrayals, the final one being for love. So, good call.
I’ve been saying for a few weeks that D&D threw logic and continuity under the bus for the sake of spectacle. They tried to bring story back in the last episode.
Too many people had been expecting a fairy tale ending. They saw Dany as a symbol of ... insert favorite hobby horse here.
But that was never the story Martin was telling. If his story was indeed the end of feudalism, it must have taken at least 20 minutes to bring that in. >SARCASM< Having Edmure Tully (Oh, sit down, Uncle) put himself forward as King was priceless.

Cynical old fart that I am, I was completely expecting Arya to ride in on a pale horse and be Death. Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar. The story fooled me there, as it has time and again. Gotcha.

No. I will not be signing any petition to re-do the final season. I was shown the story they wanted to tell me, and not the one I wanted to see. I can’t demand that Richard III live long and prosper, just because he has the best lines.

:roll: :roll: :roll:

Jaysus, you and the nutty professor are easily entertained...

No one was expecting as fairy tale ending, but we were expecting consistency. Who was expecting Dany bois to be a symbol of anything other than entitlement and D&D's mouthpiece for whatever shallow stance they were trying to make? The story ceased being Martin's since the start of the Dorne arc and more D&D's watered down generic crap loosely based on some outline and conveniently wrapped up, like the movie version of The Scarlet Letter.

The Real Reason Fans Hate the Last Season of Game of Thrones:It's not just bad storytelling—it’s because the storytelling style changed from sociological to psychological...
Game of Thrones, in its eighth and final season, is as big as television gets these days. More than 17 million people watched the season’s opening. Judging by the fan and critic reaction though, it seems that a substantial portion of those millions are loathing the season. Indeed, most of the reviews and fan discussions seem to be pondering where the acclaimed series went wrong, with many theories on exactly why it went downhill.

The show did indeed take a turn for the worse, but the reasons for that downturn go way deeper than the usual suspects that have been identified (new and inferior writers, shortened season, too many plot holes). It’s not that these are incorrect, but they’re just superficial shifts. In fact, the souring of Game of Thrones exposes a fundamental shortcoming of our storytelling culture in general: we don’t really know how to tell sociological stories.

At its best, GOT was a beast as rare as a friendly dragon in King’s Landing: it was sociological and institutional storytelling in a medium dominated by the psychological and the individual. This structural storytelling era of the show lasted through the seasons when it was based on the novels by George R. R. Martin, who seemed to specialize in having characters evolve in response to the broader institutional settings, incentives and norms that surround them.

After the show ran ahead of the novels, however, it was taken over by powerful Hollywood showrunners David Benioff and D. B. Weiss. Some fans and critics have been assuming that the duo changed the narrative to fit Hollywood tropes or to speed things up, but that’s unlikely. In fact, they probably stuck to the narrative points that were given to them, if only in outline form, by the original author. What they did is something different, but in many ways more fundamental: Benioff and Weiss steer the narrative lane away from the sociological and shifted to the psychological. That’s the main, and often only, way Hollywood and most television writers tell stories.

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