Quite An Odyssey

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Expand view Topic review: Quite An Odyssey

Re: Quite An Odyssey

Post by geronimo » Sat Jan 09, 2016 1:52 pm

kawasaki wrote:
geronimo wrote:
All of this. I almost put my back out in Gran Canaria from the weight of books in my luggage needed to survive 9 days sitting by a fucking pool.



Why do people go on holidays they hate?

9 days of sitting by a pool sounds like hell to me too. Which is why I don't do it :)


Little brain was in charge.

Re: Quite An Odyssey

Post by Skipp NLI » Sat Jan 09, 2016 7:48 am

Don't get me started on the Culture Novels. They are pretty much my favourite science fiction of all time.

Excession is particularly impressive imp, breath taking stuff.

Re: Quite An Odyssey

Post by Levied Troop » Fri Jan 08, 2016 4:42 pm

A Chaotic Humphrey wrote: - how it gets dog-eared as someone has folded a corner when they stop reading, or have marked a passage.


I hate you and your kind :argue: I'm getting you a book marker for next Christmas and confiscating the highlighter pen.


1. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens - Gave up on Dickens after reading A Christmas Carol, nothing I've heard since has changed my mind
2. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien -Of course, but after LOTR
3. The Bible - Forced to read chunks but I mainly focussed on the Gustav Dore illustrations
6. The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway - Did Farewell to Arms at school and liked it, started Old Man and hated it
8. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller - yes, almost obligatory in the house I shared after leaving school
9. 1984 by George Orwell - Oh yes
11. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy - Twice! The original BBC series was excellent as well, I'm almost scared to try the new version
12. Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson - Great fun
16. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen - yes but can't honestly remember how I felt about it. Might have to try it again.

Being incapacitated over Christmas I got stuck into all my 'Culture' novels by Ian M Banks for a third time. Still a brilliant read.

Re: Quite An Odyssey

Post by kawasaki » Fri Dec 11, 2015 2:26 pm

geronimo wrote:
All of this. I almost put my back out in Gran Canaria from the weight of books in my luggage needed to survive 9 days sitting by a fucking pool.



Why do people go on holidays they hate?

9 days of sitting by a pool sounds like hell to me too. Which is why I don't do it :)

Re: Quite An Odyssey

Post by geronimo » Fri Dec 11, 2015 11:12 am

Hastati wrote:
A Chaotic Humphrey wrote:I've never got the Kindle/ebook thing.
It's not for me.


I can see that. The Kindle is great because it means I have about 300 odd books available anywhere, anytime. It doesn't replace my library, it just makes part of it portable. When I'm on holiday I can burn through a novel a day, so having the Kindle beats carting 10-12 books in the suitcase. Any book I really want to keep I buy in hard copy, I have plenty of duplicates between the Kindle and the library. It's also useful for reading pdfs of wargame rules. I personally don't know anyone who has stopped buying hard copy books because they have a e-reader.


All of this. I almost put my back out in Gran Canaria from the weight of books in my luggage needed to survive 9 days sitting by a fucking pool.

Re: Quite An Odyssey

Post by Clayface » Fri Dec 11, 2015 9:18 am

[quote="Sane Max"]Here's a list of the books people claim to have read but haven't.

I am embarrassed to admit I have not read over half of them.

1. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens - school - Hated it.
2. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien Of Course
3. The Bible - whole thing, in a week, for a bet. The begats get very wearing
4. Moby Dick by Herman Melville - School again a good book
5. The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand Nope
6. The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway Nope, Not a big Hemingway fan
7. Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov Nope
8. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller Yes, classic angsty ten read, it's good
9. 1984 by George Orwell Oh yes
10. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Only a few years ago
11. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy Nope. started it at least three times.
12. Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson Yes
13. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert No
14. The Odyssey by Homer No
15. Ulysses by James Joyce lord no
16. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen No!
17. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte Yes, not bad actually
18. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck No
19. The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath No
20. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger Oh yes, and like it a lot. In fact I think EVERYONE should read it. Where does Ringo Starr Live?
21. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne Yes, and it's actually very good
22. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky Lord No

Re: Quite An Odyssey

Post by Hastati » Fri Dec 11, 2015 8:12 am

A Chaotic Humphrey wrote:I've never got the Kindle/ebook thing.
It's not for me.


I can see that. The Kindle is great because it means I have about 300 odd books available anywhere, anytime. It doesn't replace my library, it just makes part of it portable. When I'm on holiday I can burn through a novel a day, so having the Kindle beats carting 10-12 books in the suitcase. Any book I really want to keep I buy in hard copy, I have plenty of duplicates between the Kindle and the library. It's also useful for reading pdfs of wargame rules. I personally don't know anyone who has stopped buying hard copy books because they have a e-reader.

Re: Quite An Odyssey

Post by EnglishRed » Fri Dec 11, 2015 1:07 am

I've actually read a respectable number of those books. Some at school (Pride and Prejudice, The Bell Jar) and university (The Odyssey) but mostly after making a decision as a precocious (pretentious?) Teen to read a load of classic and in particular penguin modern classics. Some bona fide greats there. 1984, Catch 22, Lolita, Of Mice and Men ..I even read War and Peace as a 17 year old-I skipped a lot of the pontificating but generally enjoyed it. I seem to remember the Borodino bits being good.

Strangely despite being a fantasy nerd as a kid I've never read the Hobbit.

Re: Quite An Odyssey

Post by kawasaki » Thu Dec 10, 2015 8:50 pm

A Chaotic Humphrey wrote:
Hastati wrote:Also, seeing something here on Frothers got me reading the works of M.R. James, and he is utterly brilliant.


Yeah, I like M R James as well.
You may find this useful:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00pfmfr


and this.

http://www.mrjamespodcast.com/about-the-podcas/

It gets a bit precious at times though.

If you've got Spotify there are some M R James audiobooks on there read by Brit actors

Re: Quite An Odyssey

Post by kawasaki » Thu Dec 10, 2015 8:29 pm

Oh, 'list of classic books I can fib about reading so I look really clever'

Sane Max wrote:Here's a list of the books people claim to have read but haven't.

I am embarrassed to admit I have not read over half of them.

1. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
2. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien read it
3. The Bible read some of it, goes with the Catlick
4. Moby Dick by Herman Melville read the children's classics abridged version :)
5. The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand
6. The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway Hemingway is a really crap writer. I read his essay 'A Moveable Feast'. He's a name-dropping twat too
7. Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
8. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
9. 1984 by George Orwell read it, Animal Farm is better. His essay 'Down and out in London and Paris is worth a look too
10. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
11. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy started it, decided life was too short...
12. Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
13. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
14. The Odyssey by Homer
15. Ulysses by James Joyce started it, decided it was a pile of pish
16. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
17. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte it's on the bookshelves...
18. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
19. The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
20. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
21. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
22. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky



I have read a fair chunk of Balzac's Comedie Humaine though. Some of them in French :)

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